24。

Name:Sally
From:Taipei,Taiwan
Language:Mandarin,English

asylum-art:

Photographer Sandro Miller Recreates Famous Portraits With John Malkovich As His Model

 sandrofilm.comedelmangallery.com | petapixel

Renowned photographer Sandro Miller has worked together with legendary Hollywood A-Lister John Malkovich many times, but when Miller wanted to celebrate the photography greats that had inspired and guided him, he had to do something special. So he, with Malkovich as his dashing unisex model, recreated some of those influential photographers’ most important portraits in a photo series called “Malkovich, Malkovich, Malkovich: Homage to photographic masters.”

The series puts both Miller’s exceptional photography and Malkovich’s masterful acting talents front and center. Miller gets each amazing portrait’s lighting, mood and composition down perfectly, while Malkovich replicates the subject’s emotions and expressions so perfectly that the photos become nearly indistinguishable, regardless of the age or gender of the original subject. And it was all done without Photoshop!

  1. Philippe Halsman / Salvador Dalí (1954), 2014
  2. Herb Ritts / Jack Nicholson, London (1988) (A), 2014
  3. Andy Warhol / Self Portrait (Fright Wig) (1986), 2014
  4. Bert Stern / Marilyn in Pink Roses (from The Last Session,1962),2014
  5. Irving Penn / Pablo Picasso, Cannes, France (1957), 2014
  6. Yousuf Karsh / Ernest Hemingway (1957), 2014
  7. Albert Watson / Alfred Hitchcock with Goose (1973), 2014
  8. Arthur Sasse / Albert Einstein Sticking Out His Tongue (1951), 214
  9. Victor Skrebneski / Bette Davis (1971), Los Angeles Studio, 2014
  10. Edward Sheriff Curtis / Three Horses (1905), 2014

Via: boredpanda

(via prufrocking)

topgear-appreciation:

submitted by i-need-more-time-for-books

My first episode ever was the one with Geoff, the ecological car. I saw it by accident, to be honest, because my father was looking for something to watch and then noticed that one of Top Gear’s episodes was starting. He said to me: “Oh, I like this programme”. I asked: “What’s it about?” and he anwsered: “Cars. Theoretically… But it’s funny, maybe you’ll like it” Like? I almost died of laughter while watching it and I was wondering, how were they alive for so long, haha. Anyway, I wanted to watch more episodes, maybe 3 or 4… I ended up watching entire season. Every time I was in a bad mood, Top Gear would make me laugh and I knew I’d fallen in love with those three idiots.

lady-wilwarin:

don’t be rude! Hannibal don’t like McDonald’s! (x)

lady-wilwarin:

don’t be rude! Hannibal don’t like McDonald’s! (x)

amazelife:

cedrichohnstadt:

storyshots:

Drawing from films

Drawing from films is a ridiculously useful exercise. It’s not enough to watch films; it’s not enough to look at someone else’s drawings from films. If you want to be in story, there’s no excuse for not doing this.

The way this works: you draw tons of tiny little panels, tiny enough that you won’t be tempted to fuss about drawing details. You put on a movie - I recommend Raiders, E.T., or Jaws… but honestly if there’s some other movie you love enough to freeze frame the shit out of, do what works for you. It’s good to do this with a movie you already know by heart.

Hit play. Every time there’s a cut, you hit pause, draw the frame, and hit play til it cuts again. If there’s a pan or camera move, draw the first and last frames.

Note on movies: Spielberg is great for this because he’s both evocative and efficient. Michael Bay is good at what he does, but part of what he does is cut so often that you will be sorry you picked his movie to draw from. Haneke is magnificent at what he does, but cuts so little that you will wind up with three drawings of a chair. Peter Jackson… he’s great, but not efficient. If you love a Spielberg movie enough to spend a month with it, do yourself a favor and use Spielberg.

What to look for:

  • Foreground, middle ground, background: where is the character? What is the point of the shot? What is it showing? What’s being used as a framing device? How does that help tie this shot into the geography of the scene? Is the background flat, or a location that lends itself to depth?
  • Composition: How is the frame divided? What takes up most of the space? How are the angles and lines in the shot leading your eye?
  • Reusing setups, economy: Does the film keep coming back to the same shot? The way liveaction works, that means they set up the camera and filmed one long take from that angle. Sometimes this includes a camera move, recomposing one long take into what look like separate shots. If you pay attention, you can catch them.
  • Camera position, angle, height: Is the camera fixed at shoulder height? Eye height? Sitting on the floor? Angled up? Down? Is it shooting straight on towards a wall, or at an angle? Does it favor the floor or the ceiling?
  • Lenses: wide-angle lens or long lens? Basic rule of thumb: If the character is large in frame and you can still see plenty of their surroundings, the lens is wide and the character is very close to camera. If the character’s surroundings seem to dwarf them, the lens is long (zoomed in).
  • Lighting: Notice it, but don’t draw it. What in the scene is lit? How is this directing your eye? How many lights? Do they make sense in the scene, or do they just FEEL right?

This seems like a lot to keep in mind, and honestly, don’t worry about any of that. Draw 100 thumbnails at a time, pat yourself on the back, and you will start to notice these things as you go.


Don’t worry about the drawings, either. You can see from my drawings that these aren’t for show. They’re notes to yourself. They’re strictly for learning. 

Now get out there and do a set! Tweet me at @lawnrocket and I’ll give you extra backpats for actually following through on it. Just be aware - your friends will look at you super weird when you start going off about how that one shot in Raiders was a pickup - it HAD to be - because it doesn’t make sense except for to string these other two shots together…

This is excellent advice. I’ve done something very similar before and you do learn a lot. Really forces to you think and learn.

looking fwd to doing this

(via prufrocking)

myampgoesto11:

Helen Pynor: Liquid Ground

Conceived from her research into the numerous recorded cases of accidental drowning in london’s thames river, 
Australian artist Helen Pynor has created ‘Liquid Ground’, a series of large-scale photographs which capture 
various water-buoyed garments expelling human organs from within its floating form. simultaneously haunting and surreal, 
the unexpected injection of internal organs into an otherwise dreamy underwater scene results in a collection of images 
that is arresting in both a visual and visceral manner.

Pynor explores new ways in which we can relate to our body’s makeup by rejecting the celebration of gore and horror but drawing from both personal and cultural stories. utilizing phantom forms, the notion of the human body is approached in a highly sensitive and emotional manner despite the morbidity of the subject matter.

via Design Boom

Helen Pynor gained a BSc (Hons) in Biology at Macquarie University majoring in cellular and molecular biology, a BVA at Sydney College of the Arts, The University of Sydney majoring in photography, sculpture and installation, and a PhD at Sydney College of the Arts, The University of Sydney. In her doctoral thesis, she sought the reconciliation of materialist understandings of the human body with understandings of the body as a culturally-constructed entity, a theme she continues to explore.

Pynor draws extensively from the writings of scientists as well as philosophers of biology, in addition to working with scientists in both collaborative and consultative roles. Her practice is integrally tied to a questioning of the philosophical and material status of human and non-human organisms. (via)

My Amp Goes To 11Twitter | Instagram

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Molly Landreth

Embodiment: A Portrait of Queer Life in America

1. Ducky and Her Friends, Cedar Rapids, IA. 2007 

2. Ashley, Jackson, MS. 2009 I think about my life and how hard it is to be a loud mouth, out of the closet, black lesbian living in the south and how I wouldnt change it for the world. - Ashley

3. Cat and Brittany, Iowa City, IA. 2009 I gave you my heart six years ago and you have cradled it more gently than I have. I promise to hold your heart, your hand, and your body with love and respect and joy yesterday, today and tomorrow. - Cat speaking to Brittany during their wedding ceremony which was held the day after this photograph was taken.

4. Charlie and Honey, Seattle, WA. 2005

5. Cooper, Oakland, CA. 2009 At the second this image is captured, however, I am beaming from the inside out. Cant recall what nudged me toward this moment of joy. But I am grateful for the reminder. - Cooper

6. Gary and Jeremy, Brooklyn, NY. 2005

7. The Jentlemen of Distinction, East Saint Louis, MO. 2009 Being a Jentlemen is about hard work, dedication and being a family. These are my BROTHERS, no matter whatâ?¦. I am PROUD to be a Jentlemen. I hold my head up high and proud! - Dusty of The Jentlemen of Distinction

8. Nomy, Oakland, CA

9. Chickadee and Her Family, Concrete, WA. 

10. Jesus, Dallas, TX. 2009 Thank you so much for doing this project as well as allowing me to become a part of it. You guys came into my life during a chapter of my metamorphosis where I felt that I had no chance at life and I have found an immense source of inspiration from you alls presence. - Jesus 

(via prufrocking)